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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Kind of where I'm at. No room, and the surplus gets relegated to the shop building where only I see them for the most part.
We don’t have people over, so very few people ever see my mounts anyway. I’m gradually taking a few of mine and my youngest son’s lesser mounts to my OK house, but I’m keeping my big ones here at home.

I still haven’t got my 2020 mount back yet, but the taxidermist called last week to finalize a few details and let me know he’s getting close.
 

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My wife’s antelope and my bear rug will be the only mounts aside from some Turkey fans and euros that I did. Had a couple ducks but they were destroyed in an accident. It’s all about the memories!!
 

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Congrats! Remember the circulatory system is a pressurized system. If you crack the block, fluids ooze out, if you cut a hose, it sprays everywhere. Lungs are doughy and full of pockets for fluid to deposit, it can take a long time to saturate a lung before it leaks into the chest cavity and eventually finds the exit/entrance hole to drip onto the ground. Cut an artery and that chest cavity fills up exponentially faster. A deer running 30 yards isn't typically long enough to deposit blood on the ground. Analyze your hit, check what organs were cut before you blame it on your equipment. Too many people don't think about physiology and what causes bleeding and just think arrows make blood explode everywhere. The Ranch Fairy (Troy Fowler) on YouTube is a respiratory therapist/hunting guide, he has at-length videos explaining the cardiopulmonary system and what causes bleeding when shot by an arrow and what to expect. Quite informative, it changed how I think about killing with a broadhead
 
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