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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You may use a dolly or a wheelbarrow to recover game from the field or do other tasks. I've discovered how to make changing a tube on various push vehicles easier.

Are dolly and wheelbarrow tire inner tubes a pain to work on unless the two rim halves are bolted together?


To dismount tire on one side of wheel only to remove inner tube:

-pry the bead over the rim on the valve stem side only; tube should be completely deflated for removal
-use three metal bicycle tire irons to pry tire bead over rim all the way around; don't use screwdrivers as they may damage a good tire or a tube repairable by patch
-you can now pull out the old tube as shown in the videos, it may be tricky

To install tube and mount tire:

-carefully push tube in around inside of rim on open bead side and align valve with hole in wheel, this takes some fiddling; see videos
-use vise-grip pliers to anchor one point of tire bead: clamp pliers onto lip of rim firmly
-press the bead under the rim where the pliers are clamped on
-work the bead around clockwise from the anchor point in one direction looking down from top
-use both hands, elbow grease and body weight to gradually press bead completely under the rim lip
-the pliers hold the bead in place to prevent slipping back over the rim at the starting anchor point
-it may help to have wheel held firmly in a bench vice or mounted on the vehicle to remount the tire bead
-it helps if you can press the bead back in place downward with the rim facing upward
-make sure the pliers jaws firmly clamp the rim just at the lip


If goat heads are a problem where you hunt, you may want to put the green Slime product of Flat Attack in your dolly or wheelbarrow tires to instantly seal punctures. A small bicycle pump is handy for game-recovery carts with pneumatic tires in the field too. I have Marathon tires on my Harper hand-truck and that rubber is not very pliable at all. I had to put a new Firestone inner tube in the other day. Tubeless tires are almost impossible to seat the bead at home. I spent $50 seven years ago replacing my stock tubeless dolly wheels with tube types. There is no way I could push the bead around the rim lip as the guy was doing in the video with the yellow wheel. Marathon tires have very stiff beads and my wheels are metal with relatively-sharp lips. The pliers clamped on the lip did the trick though to hold the bead under the rim lip at the start point. The wheel was on the dolly axle with the dolly lying on the floor sideways with the wheel facing up. I was able to sit in a chair and press the bead back around over the rim lip with the heels of both hands together as close to the rim lip as possible in the manner of giving a CPR patient chest compressions. I was just gradually working all away around the tire until I got back home to the pliers again. Of course, you will remove the pliers once the tire is back on the rim.

My methods beat the following video tutorials:


 
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I’d buy the semi pneumatic tires that will never go flat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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I use a game cart with solid rubber tires.
 
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During my game recovery days in Montana I always used a cheap kids toboggan to recover game. Cheap, light and slides over everything, works in brush, grass, stubble, rock, mud and water, oh yeah and snow.. Takes up very little room-even acts as storage tray in the bed of your truck. Cheap throw away.

I would drill a series of holes down sides of the sled like eyelets in a shoe. Then using these holes I tied the game in with parachute cord, lacing up like shoe. In the nose for the pull rope, I would attach couple eye bolts drilled through the edge and through wooden dowels underneath the lip. Washers would go on top of the plastic lip with the stem of eye bolt going the through washer, plastic lip, dowel, washer and nut. Attach pull rope through the eyes. I would run this pull rope through a length garden hose for comfort. I have pulled these by hand and behind ATV and they work well. The pull rope attachment is where these sleds fail so reinforce.

When I was in Afghanistan I saw a number of the rolled plastics litters used for dragging casualties, based on this same principle. Never saw one used, thank the Lord. I have looked for one of these surplus but haven't seen them. But I no longer hunt where I have to do this work. Old guy lets the young guides do all the work.

I have over the years used a couple of different game carts and they all worked. Some better than others. The are bulky, expensive and can be difficult moving over rocky ground and sink in over loose soil or sand. They are all miles better than just dragging the game.

Here is a tip taught me many year go by some one I have long forget who. Carry in your field dressing kit a grain sack sewing needle and twine. If you dress in the field, cut only to the breast bone and remove every thing you can by reaching in side. Even reaching up inside to cut the trachea. Never cut the the throat in the field, the animal should dead by time you reach and you will get most blood out field dressing. In the field keep the cuts and openings to the minimum to keep dirt out. After field dressing, sew the belly back shut with the twine and needle before dragging out.. When you get out of the field, then open everything up so the game can cool.
 

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I've priced new inner tubes and found that most of the time and wheel and tire are about the same price as just the tube. Also, you can shoot expanding foam into an innertube and it'll never go flat. Just have to monitor the expansion and let some out or it'll pop the tire off the rim.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It sounds like a 4-wheel all-terrain deer cart with foam-filled tires might be in order. I'm not sure yet to what extent motor vehicles can be used or get close to your downed deer to pick it up in Oklahoma. I used to hunt deer on private land with a guide and the guide drove the truck close to the downed deer on his own private ranch. Some public hunting lands might be anti-vehicle; they want you to really sweat to get your venison to the truck. The terrain and weather might only let you get so close and property rules may also put the damper on vehicle use too. Ideally, the closer you can get your pickup truck to the downed deer, the better. It seems like down in the southern states, I've watched a number of videos with dog-drives down south, there are a lot of dirt roads through flat woodsy hunting fields to get trucks and ATVs in close to your dead deer. How "truck-friendly" is Oklahoma for public-accessible-land deer hunters with regard to getting your deer out of the woods with little dragging or humping? It's nice to make your vehicle do the hard work if you can and the land manager OK's it.
 

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Most public lands in Ok including OLAP don’t allow vehicles off of maintained roads for a reason. #1 is to protect the environment and #2 is so folks won’t be driving around disturbing other hunters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Then there are electric carts!! Lithium battery technology. Some electric deer carts cost a good used car. Some of these utility jobs can be had for under a grand.This one is supposed to go three hours on a full charge.

 
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That is probably allowed off of maintained roads.
 

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What a bunch of light weights! Just get it field dressed and then run the front legs through the where the tarsal glands are removed from the back legs and you can then tie them off with either some of your hair from your ponytail or some cord. Can’t use your boot laces because you should be barefoot. Slip your arms through both legs like you are putting on a backpack and walk out with it.
I remember several times where either I or a friend had shot a buck and it was either extremely muddy or had many ditches or creeks to cross to get them out. I think the bigger or wider wheels would be better for the mud. I like DoubleD idea about the toboggan if I had to cross some bad ditches. In a perfect world any assistance in game removal is greatly appreciated but don’t forget about mud or terrain. One part of hunting I never really liked was dragging one until your body quits you. I have found myself a few times sitting on a log, soaked in sweat and asking myself “why in the [email protected]#l did I shoot this SOB all the way back in here?”


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Somewhere I have a pic of the sled I built to get elk off the mountain. Not your common snow sled
The original purpose is an ice sled to get supplies on and off ice fishing place up North.
I added reinforcements and loops to be able to lace the elk into the sled, and a towing hitch.
I use it around the house to take the grandkids for a wild ride across the yard behind the 4 wheeler lol n the off season. I’ll try to find that pic.
The sled is currently available in the attic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If you are super rich and super weak you can even hire a helicopter to extract your deer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

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Here is must be self propelled only. No combustion engines or electric motors allowed on any closed roads. I use a mountain bike with my game cart on the back to get into my site areas quicker and haul my bait site stuff.
6585
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I have some degree of physical limitations. Asthma. Heart palpitations under exertion. Game laws allow vehicle access for certain hunters with health issues.They need a special permit.
 

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Somewhere I have a pic of the sled I built to get elk off the mountain. Not your common snow sled
The original purpose is an ice sled to get supplies on and off ice fishing place up North.
I added reinforcements and loops to be able to lace the elk into the sled, and a towing hitch.
I use it around the house to take the grandkids for a wild ride across the yard behind the 4 wheeler lol n the off season. I’ll try to find that pic.
The sled is currently available in the attic.
I had one ATV sleds of those I bought from Cabela's. Pull an elk out of the Sweetgrass Hill in it. The rocks shredded the bottom. I The rancher where I was hunting told me to call Cabela's and they would send me a new one-they did The rancher said he could buy the same sled as a feed sled from the farms store-it was more money and warranty was limited. That was why he bought from Cabela's the warranty was unlimited and the sleds got better after a couple of years and he had not wore one out yet.

At age 40, I would like the Mountain bike idea, at age 73 I am thinking the bike needs donated to goodwill.
 

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I had one ATV sleds of those I bought from Cabela's. Pull an elk out of the Sweetgrass Hill in it. The rocks shredded the bottom. I The rancher where I was hunting told me to call Cabela's and they would send me a new one-they did The rancher said he could buy the same sled as a feed sled from the farms store-it was more money and warranty was limited. That was why he bought from Cabela's the warranty was unlimited and the sleds got better after a couple of years and he had wore one out yet.

At age 40, I would like the Mountain bike idea, at age 73 I am thinking the bike needs donated to goodwill.
So far mine is holding out good. Mainly used it in snow area but still have to pull it over rocks. I was thinking about getting some Teflon strips and attaching them to the runners on the bottom of the sled to be used as a consumable.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
If a person has limited abilities he can get a special permit to allow deer hunting use of a vehicle to "cheat" if you can get your doctor to sign the paperwork. When we get late 50's on up, we are going to think it so nice to rely upon using the truck as much as we can. Some hunters have access to mules or horses for hunting which are generally not excluded from public lands or OLAPs. Not all of us have the economic means to come by the use of pack animals and not all of us are athletic young spring chickens. They, the powers that control the public-accessible hunting lands, should at least lax restrictions on the use of quiet electric vehicles, though. In Oklahoma ATV's are expensive to rent by the day if you are even allowed to use them on the land to hunt in the first place. Renting pack animals is not a cheap affair either. The electric-powered push cart might be a boon to many a hunter up in years though. Hunters can also use a deer stand close to where the truck is parked, but I like walking, stalking or just sitting on a log waiting for a deer to come down a trail from a bed to water that's been already scouted.
 
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