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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a question for all you smart people. Can a guy who's never done it before reblue a gun at home and expect to get good results? I mean I don't expect to crank out a masterpiece on my first try but can I expect to get close to as good as a mass produced middle of the road rifles bluing?
I've got an old 22 that's rusted all to heck and I'm thinking of polishing it up with my Dremel and some polishing compound or maybe borrowing a buffer from a friend or something and reblue everything. I thought about taking it to a gunsmith but I thought what the heck it'll be a lot of fun if I do it myself as long as I can get good results I don't want it to look worse than when I start.
 

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You can certainly do it yourself.
Birchwood Casey makes a cold blue and a hot blue product.
IMHO the cold blue is mainly for touchup on existing bluing jobs. The hot blue is much more durable.
I did a .410 single shot barrel years ago. Hit it with some solvent, put it in the oven for awhile, rubbed some blue on it, back into the oven to slowly cool.
coming out, it was horrible looking.
No internet back then so went to the library to get some help.
what I found was that if the metal isn’t perfectly clean, the blueing will bubble up like rain on a fresh waxed car hood and not penetrate the pores of the metal.
Eventually heated the barrel in the oven, used Trichloetalene to wipe down the hot barrel several times with a white rag until the rag came clean. Can’t get that chemical anymore but there are substitutes. Still have that shotgun. The blueing is not as pristine as the day it was applied but still there.
Didn’t look but I’ll bet there is a lot of information on YouTube about that process with a lot more knowledge than I can provide.
It will be a fun project.
 

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Your project is how I learned to re-blue and sand/linseed oil stocks.

I used 4-5 coats of Brownells Oxpho blue liquid, lightly buffing with 0000 steel wool between coats, then 4-5 coats of the Oxpho Blue cream. The result is a very good cold blue. It is a bit more gray than a deep factory blue, and will somewhat wear off each time you oil the metal (the bluing just leaves your rag dark...it does not appear to come off the metal).

Of course, you need to put in your prep work. I used three grits of fabric sandpaper, with the factory roll mark taped off until the finest grit (320). The more shiny the metal, the more shiny the bluing...and if you leave any factory bluing on there it WILL show. Same with sanding in different directions, it will show. Don't forget to acetone your metal prior to bluing, and then use a coat of gun oil afterwards to stop the rust process.

Hot bluing is much better and more durable, but requires more equipment.

Overall a very fun and rewarding process. I took some real junkers and made them look just about like they did when they came out of the factory (can't do plastic work for the buttstock).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nice thanks guys.
I guess I'll have to break down and watch some YouTube videos as much as I hate to do that. I'll post some pictures someday when I finally get around to it. I've got to have the gunsmith make a couple of other repairs first though to make it chamber properly without shaving the side of the bullet off and feed shells down the tubular magazine reliably.
 

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Lead build up on the feed ramp can cause some of those shaving issues.
.22 rimfires are famous for that.
 

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Be interested in your results. Your post got me digging around in the gun safe. I inherited 8 long guns from FIL that passed. All were just cheap .22's, .410's with one Marlin lever gun as the only real nice one. I may refinish one of the others just as a fun project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Be interested in your results. Your post got me digging around in the gun safe. I inherited 8 long guns from FIL that passed. All were just cheap .22's, .410's with one Marlin lever gun as the only real nice one. I may refinish one of the others just as a fun project.
Speaking of cheap 22s I am looking for a Marlin model 60 if you happen to have one you want to part with.
 

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Speaking of cheap 22s I am looking for a Marlin model 60 if you happen to have one you want to part with.
I do have one, but also have this little issue that I can't shake.
I'm a firearms buyer, not a seller.
Sold two or three in my lifetime that were bought to be traders.
One was a Remington 1100 that had been left in a sheep's wool gun case for probably 10 years. The amount of rust and pitting on it was incredible. A guy at work offered it to me for $50 so he could make his rent. The action was still smooth and the bore bright so I bought it.
Ugliest gun I'd ever seen. The following year, it was getting close to dove season and sold it to a guy for $100. He used it for a season and sold it back to me for $75. Nobody else would pay a dime for it because it was so ugly. Next year same deal, sold it to a guy ahead of dove season for $100. This was around 1982 or so.
Fast forward to 2021, we were eating at a local restaurant when some voice hollered out my name as we were walking out. It was the guy who bought the 1100 last. Said he had to update me on it. Still shooting it, gets great comments about how ugly it is and wouldn't part with it because it's so reliable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I do have one, but also have this little issue that I can't shake.
I'm a firearms buyer, not a seller.
Sold two or three in my lifetime that were bought to be traders.
One was a Remington 1100 that had been left in a sheep's wool gun case for probably 10 years. The amount of rust and pitting on it was incredible. A guy at work offered it to me for $50 so he could make his rent. The action was still smooth and the bore bright so I bought it.
Ugliest gun I'd ever seen. The following year, it was getting close to dove season and sold it to a guy for $100. He used it for a season and sold it back to me for $75. Nobody else would pay a dime for it because it was so ugly. Next year same deal, sold it to a guy ahead of dove season for $100. This was around 1982 or so.
Fast forward to 2021, we were eating at a local restaurant when some voice hollered out my name as we were walking out. It was the guy who bought the 1100 last. Said he had to update me on it. Still shooting it, gets great comments about how ugly it is and wouldn't part with it because it's so reliable.
I didn't really take you for a seller but I figured I couldn't hurt by asking.
Have you shot that model 60 much? Those are sweet little guns. I used to be able to hit an 8-in Circle at 50 yards every time firing as fast as I could pull the trigger standing without a rest of any kind. I would make headshots on quail at around 25 to 50 yards. I still have the gun but it's my stepdads and I should return it someday so I am looking for one.
 

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I didn't really take you for a seller but I figured I couldn't hurt by asking.
Have you shot that model 60 much? Those are sweet little guns. I used to be able to hit an 8-in Circle at 50 yards every time firing as fast as I could pull the trigger standing without a rest of any kind. I would make headshots on quail at around 25 to 50 yards. I still have the gun but it's my stepdads and I should return it someday so I am looking for one.
I have the carbine model with the short barrel. It doesn't get used much anymore, as it hangs on a nail in the shop to be used against garden and yard varmints.
It was just as accurate if not more accurate than the two Ruger 10-22's I have with stainless barrels.
 
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