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G

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Have any of ya'lll used this and what do ya think? It looks like a good design, but is the Boresnake worth the $? ??? ::)
 

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Wayawatsi, Yes
You can always carry 1 into the field with you. Hardly even notice it to.
They work great as well.
 

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I have one for every caliber I own. I think they are great, especially for the guns where you can't get a rod thru the breach, and have to clean thru the muzzle taking a chance of ruining your crown, which will ruin accuracy. :'(

For my shotguns, I use one of those rods that have lambs wool for the full length, with a bronze brush at the end. about three or four swabs thru there, and the barrel looks polished. I do keep a little gun oil on the wool to pick up the residu, and lube at the same time. ;D
 

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That's a very good point made by Dennis there.You should all ways try to clean all your guns from the breach end as the affect it will have on your guns accuracy if you hurt,damage or so much as scratch your crown at the tip of the barrel or mess up the twist near the last foot of a rifle you may end up needing a new barrel. Not a lot of people realize that your not supposed to clean your barrels from the business end of the barrel.
Greg
 

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Thanks for the info

Michael
 

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My first .22 was a marlin lever gun, and I didn't know about cleaning from the breach. That was at the time when there was still some corrosive primers, and powder around, and it was very important to clean after each shooting session. I wore that barrel out so bad at the muzzle that you could drop a loaded .22 in the barrel to the rim. The only thing we had was a steel rod my dad made at work. Didn't have much money then to buy one.
Sure ruined that gun. As I got older and wiser, and had a little more cash in the pocket, I had a local machinist cut it off and recrown it to regain its accuracy. ;D
 

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Corrosive primers....Man you is old....Na,just kidding,I remember that Dirty powder,I still think some manufactures are using it,I have found that Federal and Kent to be some of the best loads for my shotgun,and My 7mm Mag seems to love Remington CoreLocks 140 grain projectiles up to 155's are the most accurate,I can hit a dime with the 140 Gr. ask 'ol Rich,I saw him pop in last night from Oregon,he must have been bored on his business trip and checked it out and signed up,so he's back,hasn't posted anything yet but he's in,I'm not sure on that spelling,but that has never been my Strong suit,thats why I feel tight at home here.....Doesn't seem to be a lot of peoples strong suit :D
Greg
 

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Math is my strong suite. I almost flunked English and I speak it. lol


Michael
 

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tulsahunter...Amen to what ya said about english.
 

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OLD? I'm not old.....just because I look old :'( :'( ;D Well, maybe ugly is the better term ::)

You have to be carefull these days ordering your ammo. some of the stuff you order from cheaper than dirt, sportsmans guide and the other catalogs are manufactured in foreign countries, and still use corrosive primers. Some of them are so old they still have corrosive powder :eek:
 

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Well I guess thats one good thing about living in Ca. We can't order that crap ammo,or any ammo,If you know what your ammo brands are your fine,but when you start getting that Russian junk,look out!! :eek:
I like buying all my ammo from the same guy,It 'might be a little more,but I know how much and how fast he turns it over.
Greg
 

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Your welcome,Wayawatsi
 

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I have one for every caliber I own, shotguns included.
 
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