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As always, a good video. Couple of questions and may be obvious but I have never used a thermal scope. I know you're scanning left and right to see everything that's behind your target, properly id hog vs cattle, location of houses, etc.. to know when to stop shooting one way or the other. Once you're on a group of hogs, you tend to drop the sight picture down then back up a couple of times. Is that "resetting" the thermal image? Or, are you just adjusting on the tripod prior to shooting? I see the tripod in one picture. Do you usually stand or sit for these hunts? Lastly, it looks like you had a house or barn to the 'right', do you take the hog furthest on your right with the expectation they'll run to the left away from the structures? Thanks!
 

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As always, a good video. Couple of questions and may be obvious but I have never used a thermal scope. I know you're scanning left and right to see everything that's behind your target, properly id hog vs cattle, location of houses, etc.. to know when to stop shooting one way or the other. Once you're on a group of hogs, you tend to drop the sight picture down then back up a couple of times. Is that "resetting" the thermal image? Or, are you just adjusting on the tripod prior to shooting? I see the tripod in one picture. Do you usually stand or sit for these hunts? Lastly, it looks like you had a house or barn to the 'right', do you take the hog furthest on your right with the expectation they'll run to the left away from the structures? Thanks!
Great questions man. Hopefully I can give an acceptance set of answers.

When you see me drop the image and then pick it back up, I'm just moving my position (usually closer to the hogs). I don't stop, then restart recording...I used to, but then I had an 'uh-oh' where I forgot to record again before engaging hogs.

I almost always shoot standing as it gives me the best vantage point to see hogs moving in the grass, or possible reasons to shut down (cattle moving) etc...

I also almost always try (wind depending) to get perpendicular to where I think the hogs will go once the shooting starts. 75% or more of the time they'll go where they came from as that is their last "safe spot". A lot of big league hog hunters talk about getting the hogs to move in one direction or another with the opening shot...I don't really buy into that. In the case of this video, there is dense cover 200 yards in the direction they went...and 400 yards of open ground towards the house. Only an idiot hog would run further into the open and towards a house. However I wanted to be sure that if the hogs did do something stupid and run right, I'd get at least a couple more shots in.

you get busted by the wind, or your silhouette, or poor engagement location a few times and it smartens you up :D
 

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Great questions man. Hopefully I can give an acceptance set of answers.

When you see me drop the image and then pick it back up, I'm just moving my position (usually closer to the hogs). I don't stop, then restart recording...I used to, but then I had an 'uh-oh' where I forgot to record again before engaging hogs.

I almost always shoot standing as it gives me the best vantage point to see hogs moving in the grass, or possible reasons to shut down (cattle moving) etc...

I also almost always try (wind depending) to get perpendicular to where I think the hogs will go once the shooting starts. 75% or more of the time they'll go where they came from as that is their last "safe spot". A lot of big league hog hunters talk about getting the hogs to move in one direction or another with the opening shot...I don't really buy into that. In the case of this video, there is dense cover 200 yards in the direction they went...and 400 yards of open ground towards the house. Only an idiot hog would run further into the open and towards a house. However I wanted to be sure that if the hogs did do something stupid and run right, I'd get at least a couple more shots in.

you get busted by the wind, or your silhouette, or poor engagement location a few times and it smartens you up :D
Noticed your comments about moving the pigs with shots.
That absolutely works with elk.
The area in New Mexico where I hunt is on a migration route. We use cow tags as they taste way better on the table.
The cows are typically moving in a group of 10 to way more than that.
Shooting the lead elk will 90% of the time turn the elk around to move right back at us.
 
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