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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
to share with you here as follows:

ME:
Questions about Eurasian Collared Doves in Oklahoma

1. Is this a PROTECTED species in Oklahoma? Many jurisdictions around the world, including many in North America, consider this bird a pest or invasive species.
2. Local weapons ordinances notwithstanding, are BB guns, pellet guns and/or air rifles prohibited as a lawful means for taking Eurasian Collared Doves in Oklahoma?
3. Do I need a valid hunting license or anything else to lawfully take Eurasian Collared Doves in Oklahoma?
4. Are there specific seasons for taking Eurasian Collared Doves in Oklahoma or may they be taken year round on public and/or private property?
5. Are there any limits for taking or possessing Eurasian Collared Doves?

OK GAME WARDEN:
Hello Mr. Jones,
  1. In Oklahoma Eurasian Collared Dove are protected.
  2. None of the guns you listed are a legal means of taking dove during dove season, so no you could not use them.
  3. Yes, you would need a hunting license.
  4. There is a season on them.
  5. There is no daily limit within the legal season dates as long as a head or fully feathered wing remains attached until you reach your final destination.
The dates and daily limits as found in the Oklahoma hunting regulations are copied below. Hope this answers all of your questions. Have a great day!

Dove (Mourning, White-Winged
& Eurasian Collared)
Dates
Sept. 1 - Oct. 31 and Dec. 1-29; statewide.

Daily Limit
15. The limit may consist of any combination (aggregate) of mourning, white-winged and fully dressed Eurasian collared doves (those without a head or fully feathered wing naturally attached to the carcass).

However, there is no bag limit on Eurasian collared doves provided that the head or one fully feathered wing remains naturally attached to the carcass of all such birds while being transported to their final destination.

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ME AGAIN:

Hello, Marni:


Thanks for your reply.

I was wondering what the biological or conservation reasoning is behind protecting the Eurasian Collared Dove in this state since this is purported to be an invasive species in America and abroad by various sources. This particular bird seems to be menacing to farmers especially. As far as I know, this bird has no US federal protections.

Also, what is the wildlife conservation reasoning behind the prohibition on air guns for taking dove of any species? Does federal law currently prohibit the taking of any dove species in the US by air gun? I'm an advocate for legalizing air guns' ethical use in hunting. Air guns, after all, do offer a significant public safety and noise-emissions-reduction advantage over firearms including shotguns. More hunters can routinely hit a small target accurately and humanly with a single-projectile weapon like an accurately-aimed powder rifle or an air gun and especially do so with a scope sight. It's significantly harder in marksmanship skills to humanely take a bird on the wing with a shotgun. Therefore, many shotgun-shot wounded birds, I believe, are unrecovered by shotgun hunters each and every fowl season to be wasted. I see the air gun upland-bird possibility to be a boon to wildlife conservation and ethical/safe hunting. Farmers, ranchers and rural landowners tend to appreciate air guns for hunting on their respective properties more due to enhanced safety and reduced noise. Noise from firearms otherwise spooks their animals.

I'm hoping game law legislators in Oklahoma will start to see the light real soon regarding the sensibility of the whole notion of ethical air gun hunting. This is a fast-becoming a popular sport worldwide and nationwide. Air gun hunting legalizing is getting to be in high demand these days. It's a long time coming to think outside the box [of shotgun shells] and give air guns their deserved day in the field to offer ethical fowl hunting a whole new breath of fresh [and compressed] smoke-free air.



Sincerely,
Mr. Along C. Jones V
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Dialog Follow Up


OK GAME WARDEN:

Experienced dove hunters know the difference between collared dove and mourning dove or white wing. However, many if not most of our dove hunters are "new hunters" Therefore collared dove are confined to the same season so that new hunters are not taking federally protected birds out of season by accident.

As far as air guns go, I doubt they will ever be legalized for any federally protected birds for two reasons. 1) They shoot a projectile more similar to a rifle which can be dangerous on both private and public fields where numerous hunters are scattered on the same field. 2) Many public areas require steel shot bc of the overlap with waterfowl. I am not an air gun expert, but I don't think they have steel shot.

Keep in mind, our regulations are developed to protect animals and ensure hunting for generations to come. That sometimes means setting regulations for the majority of hunters, which are quite often the most inexperienced.



ME:

Marni:


Do hunters and citizens in Oklahoma have a political mechanism whereby they can voice their input regarding this state's game regulations?

Who or what entity actually makes game/hunting regulations in this state? Does the state legislature get involved? Does our voice count as citizens when determining state game laws?


Sincerely,
(my legal name, undisclosed on this forum)


PS - I feel that if air gun hunting for dove is a safety issue on public lands, regulations could at least confine it to private properties (with consent of landowners). Many farmers don't want shotguns banging around their livestock and a high dove concentration can be a menace to grains. Eurasian collared doves, like one or more pigeon species, are especially reputed to rob grains from farmers and sometimes contaminate feed with droppings.

FYI: The ammunition (BBs) for BB guns is generally non-lead/non-toxic steel. Air guns/pellet rifles generally fire skirted lead pellets but there are no-tox/no-lead pellets available. Many rural landowners in America and abroad see air guns as much less dangerous to be employing around their barnyards and homes for pest control and small-game hunting than firearms including shotguns. Air guns are quiet and don't spook domestic animals. Some American States, I gather, have not categorized the Eurasian collared dove as a game species and/or have permitted air guns for their lawful taking.

Many air gun sportsmen also use a scope sight with magnification so it's much easier to identify a bird or animal by markings before a shot is taken than it is with shotguns typically with only beads as sights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Did you seriously sign your name to them as Mr. Along C. Jones V? If so, I'd be surprised if you get a response.
No, I used my full legal name and I can say that Mr. Along C. Jones V is not it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
You are having a conversation with the wrong person. Wardens don'tmake rules or regulations, they just enforce them.

You should be talking to the Commissioner for your district. You can find your commissioner here: Commission | Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation
I'm just continuing the dialog with the Game Warden Captain for now. Eventually my concerns will be gravitated toward the Conservation Commish.

The Warden has indicated to me that many greenhorn dove hunters are idiots and that he doesn't know squat about air guns. I don't think an air gun is any more dangerous than a shotgun on public lands. I don't think the fallout range for an air rifle is any greater than that for a powder-burning scattergun lauching multiple projectiles. Shotguns firing steel shot typically have greater muzzle velocities than those of even high-powered air guns. Game regulators may need experts to explain weapons ballistics to them for their better understanding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Letters or telephone calls to my state legislators just might simpler than straining my eyeballs thru all that crap.
 
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