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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think I'm about 1 for 6 or so on my last hog outings, and maybe 4 for about 15 over the last two months. It is getting to the point where the enjoyment of looking for them is fading quickly.

I'm guessing that 1) Whatever is left has probably moved on in most places, and 2) There must be a better food source somewhere that keeps them out of the pastures.

I have two properties that had a ton of damage over the winter, but I wasn't able to get on them to hunt much. Even those hogs are nowhere to be found right now.

I'm relatively new at this, but being my third year looking for hogs I really think they go back to foraging on stuff above the earth from about April to August. I killed a bunch last July-August, and most of them were into the bahia seed stems and not rooting.

Time will tell.
 

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I drive by a small hay meadow every day and this year every day I see more and more rooting I bet those clods will pay hell on his mower this year
 

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Maybe you killed them all....one can hope that’s the case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Maybe you killed them all....one can hope that’s the case.
In several places I've cut their numbers to where they probably won't return. I know that last year I completely killed off one sounder, all but one of another, and more than half of 4-5 more. It seems that if you can kill at least 50 percent, they have a good chance of moving off to another location.

My biggest full time problem sounders were removed last year. I did take two nights of damage this tear in that location, but it was a single boar that I killed the second time he returned.
 

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They have routines. The area I used to hunt we would slay them from November to March. Starting in May-June they disappear for the summer and don't start showing up in good numbers again until October. That said, we hunted ag fields adjacent to the river. The pigs seem to draw back and stay near water all summer, then when it's cooler start spanning out across all the ag properties. You'll get them patterned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
They have routines. The area I used to hunt we would slay them from November to March. Starting in May-June they disappear for the summer and don't start showing up in good numbers again until October. That said, we hunted ag fields adjacent to the river. The pigs seem to draw back and stay near water all summer, then when it's cooler start spanning out across all the ag properties. You'll get them patterned.
I agree.

They will definitely be closer to water all summer. Unfortunately here, there are so many creeks that their travel patterns aren't disrupted with the heat. I'm 90 percent sure that it is just a shift due to food availability. I did recover three more pigs two nights ago, but they were in the trees the whole time.

It always seems like rooting starts again in August, goes away for a month or so when the acorns drop, and then hits hard until spring green up. I am sure there are more specific patterns to each area across the state.
 

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Now let me tell you something I learned two years ago. My buddies radio collared a sow and let her go back with the herd. They would track her and ambush the group, shooting as many hogs as they could, she survived a good half dozen shootings before they popped her. (hard to see a radio collar through thermal at night) This lasted a good 6-8months.

What we learned: she would walk for miles without stopping. The day she was released she ran 2 miles before she stopped, that was across ag fields and through woods. Generally, she stayed within a 6 square mile area, except for a two week window when she moved outside that area and we couldn't find her at all. Every time we/they shot up a group of hogs, she would end up with another group shortly thereafter. The groups she was with moved almost exclusively at dusk and dawn, we sat 100 yards from a group at dusk and waited for them to move, when dusk hit they took off like a bullet to their feeding area. They generally used the same bedding areas and travel routes, and typically made large circles through their bedding areas and feeding areas. They seldom hit the same feeding area two nights in a row.

They say pigs are nomadic and don't really establish a "home range", but I beg to differ. They seem to find something comfortable and stick with it, although it's a much larger range than deer have for example. I learned pigs are incredibly social and seem to stay in the same area, to stay with the same pigs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I got into enough different sounders here on my place where I could tell which group it was by how many were left.

I agree that two nights in a row is rather rare, but not impossible. I definitely won't waste the time going to a field that was hit the very night before...but it isn't guaranteed that they won't be back. The only two times I've for sure had hogs rooting on my place this year I got into them within the week that they first started rooting. I had another group that gave me fits in 2020 because they'd only come over about once per month.

Pigs are difficult to pattern, but I've noticed a few trends because I record the data when I do get into them. You have to understand that I am obsessed with making everything more efficient in my life...and that especially goes for hunting at night when I'm losing sleep. Just like deer, hogs move more when it's cold. They move more after a hard storm comes through. They do not come out near as much in high winds. The one that surprises me most, is that I rarely see them during the solunar major or minor periods when deer etc... are supposed to be out. We're talking about an 80/20 split. So much so, that I don't even go out during the periods.
 
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