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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
...but still haven't yet been able to come by.

Mine, prefer excellent to mint, or at least fully restore-able as by polishing, rebluing and/or stock refinishing (no damaged markings, deep scratches, cracks, rust, marring or pits, no aftermarket receiver drilling)

1. pre-2000 Mossberg 500 field shotgun, 12 ga., blue

2. Savage Model 99 with round counter, plain non-take-down model in a common deer caliber OR Husqvarna Model 3000 Crown Grade bolt-action rifle (common deer calibers include: .308, .30-06, .300 Savage and .270)

4. Colt Lawman Mark III .357 revolver, 4" barrel, blue
 
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Remington 870 12ga or 20ga and a Savage 110
30-06
 

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Well...I'd get one of everything if money were no issue. However, it is an issue, so I started a quest just like your thread title over a decade ago. Nowadays, I actually have just about every old gun I wanted...and I'm glad I bought them a while ago because look at those prices now!

It just about broke me (well, my savings account never increased), but there's no way I could get what I have now again.

Diggler's 2021 big purchase was a 1981, 4", Colt Diamondback in 22LR with box and paperwork...and an Excalibur Suppressor 400 crossbow.

My 2022 big purchase is going to be a new Les Baer Concept III, or maybe a Monolith Heavyweight. I may snag a Ruger GP100 too if its an older example and prices come down a bit...those are not $800 revolvers to me.
 

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The nicest modern firearms I've ever seen were made from about 1899 through 1979. I consider the 1950's through the 1970's the Golden Age of Guns. When Colt came out with the Series 80, guns have been progressively tanking ever since.
 

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Savage model 99 pre ‘64 in .300 Savage with internal brass rolling block and round counter. After ‘64 they switched the mdl 99 from brass to steel rolling block and counter before finally eliminating the round counter all together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The single biggest turn-off to me about many present-day production guns is the sloppy markings, letters and numbers, roll stamping. Smith & Wesson did have some nice markings on some new satin stainless revolvers I saw back in 2005 at the shop. Colt has nice markings at least on the late-model King Cobra. They had sloppy markings on Series 80 1911's and later. A Colt Anaconda I saw in 1995 had rough markings. Kind of a hit and miss thing with markings. Even before 1980's Smith had some rough markings on certain model revolvers. Colt had consistently nice markings on all revolvers and Govt. Models before 1980. I knew a man (his dad was a cop) who said Colt was more expensive for wheel guns than Smith back in the day. Rank-and-file policemen carried Smiths while PD top brass and Sheriffs carried Colts. This man had a Smith Highway Patrolman he showed me which didn't have neat stampings.
 

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A 60's or 70's Colt Python .357 is a wish I had as well as a Model '94 Winchester lever gun. 70's Remmy 870 I think were the best fitting shot guns for me as well.
 

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The lettering on mid 1970’s Colt 1911’s was pretty shallow on the slide. When I got my 1977 Govt base gun custom built and then refinished in DLC, the lettering is barely readable.

I made what will probably be my “big” gun purchase for 2021 on Saturday when I bought a used Smith 329 Night Guard. I know I probably paid too much for it, but I’ve been looking for one for a while to no avail. I swore I would never buy a Smith with a lock on it, but there’s now a lock delete kit. Mine’s on the way.
6615
 

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The Colt Series 80 pistols were indeed pretty rough. The current offerings cut a lot of corners (plastic parts on some of them for crying out loud), but are generally actually a bit smoother than gins from 30 years ago.

I've got a half dozen or so 1911s out of the Colt Custom Shop. Fit and finish are decent...definitely better than my Bright Stainless Gold Cup from 1991 that has a rough spot on the inside of the slide and a 5-1/4lb trigger pull. That being said, the current Dan Wesson 1911s are fit better and cost the same as a custom shop Colt. You're still paying more for the Colt name. I collect the Colts...I shoot my Dan Wesson.

Colt beauty for your time, wearing mammoth ivory...

IMG_5510.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The lettering on mid 1970’s Colt 1911’s was pretty shallow on the slide. When I got my 1977 Govt base gun custom built and then refinished in DLC, the lettering is barely readable.

I made what will probably be my “big” gun purchase for 2021 on Saturday when I bought a used Smith 329 Night Guard. I know I probably paid too much for it, but I’ve been looking for one for a while to no avail. I swore I would never buy a Smith with a lock on it, but there’s now a lock delete kit. Mine’s on the way.
View attachment 6615
What year is that Night Guard? It's in Smith archive web pages. The specs say scandium alloy frame. One might think it must be lightweight and kicks like a wild zebra being it's a .44 Magnum.
 
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What year is that Night Guard? It's in Smith archive web pages. The specs say scandium alloy frame. One might think it must be lightweight and kicks like a wild zebra being it's a .44 Magnum.
I haven’t tried to figure out what year it was built yet, but you’re correct in that it does buck and snort with full power 44 Mag ammo. It weighs 27 ounces. I’ve mainly shot my handloads which ARE NOT flame thrower loads like Mr Hoddy likes.
 

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I haven’t tried to figure out what year it was built yet, but you’re correct in that it does buck and snort with full power 44 Mag ammo. It weighs 27 ounces. I’ve mainly shot my handloads which ARE NOT flame thrower loads like Mr Hoddy likes.
I do have to fess up the flame thrower loads are used in the Super Redhawk with 7” barrel.
 

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I do have to fess up the flame thrower loads are used in the Super Redhawk with 7” barrel.
Me too.

Not only are magnum loads NOT fun to shoot in a lightweight handgun, but you need enough barrel to get the most out of them. Fortunately for me, all of mt .44 mags have at least a 6" barrel. I think 4" is about the minimum I'd go.

I know that the Night Guard pictured isn't yours, but I would think that a much better .44SPL revolver, as there just isn't the barrel to get the velocity to warrant the recoil and huge concussion. As the owner stated, shooting less punishing handloads is a better option
 

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Me too.

Not only are magnum loads NOT fun to shoot in a lightweight handgun, but you need enough barrel to get the most out of them. Fortunately for me, all of mt .44 mags have at least a 6" barrel. I think 4" is about the minimum I'd go.

I know that the Night Guard pictured isn't yours, but I would think that a much better .44SPL revolver, as there just isn't the barrel to get the velocity to warrant the recoil and huge concussion. As the owner stated, shooting less punishing handloads is a better option
I’m using Trail Boss in both my 44 Special and magnum loads, and they’re pretty fun to shoot.
 

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I’ve been loading .44 mag down to .44 special speeds using Unique for range trips with the ladies. Not punishing at all and they enjoy the big handgun without developing a flinch.
They just wanted to shoot it one time to say they did.
I hate watching those videos where someone new to shooting is handed a 12 ga with 3 1/2” mag loads to shoot or a fire breathing load in a handgun. That person is probably ruined forever from participating in shooting sports.
 

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I’ve been loading .44 mag down to .44 special speeds using Unique for range trips with the ladies. Not punishing at all and they enjoy the big handgun without developing a flinch.
They just wanted to shoot it one time to say they did.
I hate watching those videos where someone new to shooting is handed a 12 ga with 3 1/2” mag loads to shoot or a fire breathing load in a handgun. That person is probably ruined forever from participating in shooting sports.
The wife loves here AR15 and the .223 has no kick for her at all. She wants to go shoot more now as a result.
 

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I hate watching those videos where someone new to shooting is handed a 12 ga with 3 1/2” mag loads to shoot or a fire breathing load in a handgun. That person is probably ruined forever from participating in shooting sports.
This right here.

I get downright irritated when I see that happen, and for the same reason. How many potential 2A advocates have we lost over the years because some jerk wanted a laugh at their expense?
 

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Pre 2000 gun I dream of owning....you bet, a Westley Richards Patent 1872 sporting rifle in 450 Musket No. 2. I have one in Carbine 1-1/2" carbine pattern. But I want a sporting pattern in a hunting caliber. If I found the right one it would warrant a transfer of funds from 401K, because I couldn't pay for it with my sociable security check.
 
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