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Certainly proud of his particular technique, whatever it is.
I'm not a real long-range shooter. 590 hard is my longest kill on an elk, but that's not really considered long range. I'd be interested to see what he has to say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Certainly proud of his particular technique, whatever it is.
I'm not a real long-range shooter. 590 hard is my longest kill on an elk, but that's not really considered long range. I'd be interested to see what he has to say.
So far I like it so much I ordered a copy for my best friend.
 

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I'm just going to throw this out, it has nothing to do with anyone here:

Profanity is the crutch of those unable to articulate. If you can't articulate, then you probably aren't a very good teacher. If you aren't a very good teacher, then the chances are that you weren't a great student either. If you weren't a great student, then the overwhelming odds are that you think you know how to do something better than everyone instructing you...or you think it didn't matter...take your pick or combine them.

It leads you to declare things like the hundreds of man-years of combined experience is "BS", and you somehow possess the key to perfection.

I'm not a world-class shooter by any means...but I was good enough at one point in my life to compete with them in a couple disciplines on someone else's dime. I've also a good handful of friends who have looked through crosshairs and ended lives. The elites of all shooting disciplines that I've managed to come across in my life all possessed something this author doesn't...humility. World champion long range shooters who can put 20 rounds into a dessert plate at a thousand yards, yet will take the time to ask (and answer) each other questions constantly on the firing line.

That whole second full paragraph in the last photo is 100% the exact opposite of what you should be doing. Why not ask the guy who just put 20 rounds into a 5" group at 1K what kind of gear or reloading components he's using? Why not ask him about his wind reading technique? Why not ask him about his shooting techniques and the results they give him? Chances are he's learned through years of experience and thousands upon thousands of rounds of trial and error. NOPE. This guy says "mind on the job" - and that job would be learning the hard way.

I get it...swearing and extra colorful profanity-laced statements as an instructor give you 15 bonus operator points. However the vast, VAST majority of the good information that could have been retained is lost in translation or distorted by ego because the instructor thinks he's Samuel L. Jackson incarnate on the firing line.

I could get on my soapbox about this for hours, but it does me no good to get irritated, and nobody really cares what I say anyway.

Please use literature like this as a source of entertainment, and not actual instruction.
 

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Yeah, I wasn't impressed with his presentation as stated earlier. I also served with some that are real long range shooters in combat conditions with the decorations to prove their skills.
I would like to read what he says though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I guess his rant resonated with me because I work in a field where around 80% of techs are underachievers with many bad habits and when I try to teach others I run into so many laughable fallacies that it's hard to want to continue trying. It's my understanding that in any given discipline 80% of people are just bumbling along so I figure he is likely right and the majority of marksman have bad habits they need to unlearn and as with learning any given method it's usually best if you try it in it's completeness with an open mind.
He talks a lot about the shooting skills of yesteryear that are slowly getting forgotten and how people are trying to imitate benchrest techniques developed for heavy low recoil rifles while using light magnum hunting rifles in the field and wondering why they can't shoot well.
He definitely has a big ego but he seems to know his stuff pretty well.
He has a lot of interesting cartridge information on his website.
 

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Techniques are always revolving. I enjoy watching some of the pistol grip lessons the military was taught in WWII compared to what we use now.
It was Gospel then but is it now? No.
Some of the old Vietnam sniper pics distributed to the public were for recruitment purposes only. Those that actually tried them were surprised at how ineffective they actually were.
In my early days, I went through a NRA sponsored youth shooting program using .22 rimfires.
When my kids got to that age I entered them into that program. The entire course of fire and techniques changed from what I had learned.
This was a precision shooting program with precision rifles, weighted shooting jackets, learning breathing control, and so on.
Every year the shooting team from the local National Guard is invited to shoot against the kids.
Typically, the kids win. They are learning without prior bad training.
Our gun club has had that class going every year for over 50 years now. When I took that class, it was in the old British RAF buildings they learned to fly from before being deployed to the war as pilots. Those buildings are only in photographs now, with the new indoor range in another building.
 
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So I looked this author up, thinking that I might be way off and owe him an apology.

Here is what I know for sure:
  • No LEO or military background, especially in precision marksmanship. Not necessary, but the cover photo is a bit misleading.
  • No civilian competition history, or nothing that I could find in a precision or long range style of match.
  • No formal instructional background teaching advanced marksmanship. He never founded or worked at a shooting school.

What he did do is hunt a lot, and guided hunts for a couple years. He is very much into terminal ballistics study (me too), but it would seem that he and I differ quite a bit in what we think is optimal. Doesn't mean either of us are wrong...different game animals and different experiences.

I look at him as a NZ version of a Ron Spomer, albeit with much less tact and world-wide experience (I like listening to Ron even if we're a hunting generation apart). Heck, there are dozens of outdoor writers over the decades with similar backgrounds to this guy. Each one certainly offered an area of expertise that could be helpful to 99% of hunters.

That goes back to my position on learning "advanced" marksmanship from a guy like this though...he is self-taught. In my 5 minutes of internet searching I found a couple posts that state he is pretty contradictory to most of the big name shooting schools regarding the application of fundamentals (eg. He doesn't teach to get directly behind the rifle for recoil control).

I have no idea about what his other books discuss, so I'll shut up there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So I looked this author up, thinking that I might be way off and owe him an apology.

Here is what I know for sure:
  • No LEO or military background, especially in precision marksmanship. Not necessary, but the cover photo is a bit misleading.
  • No civilian competition history, or nothing that I could find in a precision or long range style of match.
  • No formal instructional background teaching advanced marksmanship. He never founded or worked at a shooting school.

What he did do is hunt a lot, and guided hunts for a couple years. He is very much into terminal ballistics study (me too), but it would seem that he and I differ quite a bit in what we think is optimal. Doesn't mean either of us are wrong...different game animals and different experiences.

I look at him as a NZ version of a Ron Spomer, albeit with much less tact and world-wide experience (I like listening to Ron even if we're a hunting generation apart). Heck, there are dozens of outdoor writers over the decades with similar backgrounds to this guy. Each one certainly offered an area of expertise that could be helpful to 99% of hunters.

That goes back to my position on learning "advanced" marksmanship from a guy like this though...he is self-taught. In my 5 minutes of internet searching I found a couple posts that state he is pretty contradictory to most of the big name shooting schools regarding the application of fundamentals (eg. He doesn't teach to get directly behind the rifle for recoil control).

I have no idea about what his other books discuss, so I'll shut up there.
I am enjoying the book. It's amusing to me and I will try his methods and see how it goes. I may end up ditching his methods all together but I'll find out if they work for me anyway.
I really appreciate your input to keep me balanced. I always listen to all opinions and try to understand them and the background that brought them about because I learn a lot about things even from those I disagree with.
 

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So I looked this author up, thinking that I might be way off and owe him an apology.

Here is what I know for sure:
  • No LEO or military background, especially in precision marksmanship. Not necessary, but the cover photo is a bit misleading.
  • No civilian competition history, or nothing that I could find in a precision or long range style of match.
  • No formal instructional background teaching advanced marksmanship. He never founded or worked at a shooting school.

What he did do is hunt a lot, and guided hunts for a couple years. He is very much into terminal ballistics study (me too), but it would seem that he and I differ quite a bit in what we think is optimal. Doesn't mean either of us are wrong...different game animals and different experiences.

I look at him as a NZ version of a Ron Spomer, albeit with much less tact and world-wide experience (I like listening to Ron even if we're a hunting generation apart). Heck, there are dozens of outdoor writers over the decades with similar backgrounds to this guy. Each one certainly offered an area of expertise that could be helpful to 99% of hunters.

That goes back to my position on learning "advanced" marksmanship from a guy like this though...he is self-taught. In my 5 minutes of internet searching I found a couple posts that state he is pretty contradictory to most of the big name shooting schools regarding the application of fundamentals (eg. He doesn't teach to get directly behind the rifle for recoil control).

I have no idea about what his other books discuss, so I'll shut up there.
Great intel. I like Ron Spomer too. He explains things anyone can understand but yes, he is last generation. Probably never shouldered an AR or precision rifle.
Edit: I’ve never shouldered a real precision long range rifle either. AR’s are another story.
 
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I don't watch many videos but I see he has a website. Maybe he has written articles I can read.
Ron Spomer has been hunting animals across the globe and writing articles for a very long time. I like how he never fully craps (my term) on any particular cartridge. He's been doing a lot of cartridge vs. cartridge stuff lately on his YouTube channel...mostly he is just comparing the same data points you can generate yourself with a ballistics calculator. However, Ron seems to have more experience with obscure cartridges than anyone else.

Craig Boddington also comes to mind, but he lost me years ago when he shilled for Redfield for an article...it was bad. He was one of the ones that taught me that gun writers often are paid endorsers, and that articles are often advertisements.

I really liked Greg Rodriguez, but he didn't live long enough to develop a big following.
 

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There was a time back in the day when the old gun writers like Jack O’Conner and Elmer Kieth that constantly argued about the difference between heavy and slow bullets vs light and fast bullets.
Of course bullet technology was way different back in the 60’s and 70’s vs today.
My entire family but one uncle was anti gun growing up but I picked up the bug by reading sports afield and outdoor life magazines my uncle supplied me.
He was Army EOD during WWII.
I’m in the light and fast crowd for the record.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I’m in the light and fast crowd for the record.
That got me thinking about trajectory and I remembered something I was having fun with the other day. I had a bleach jug and tin can set up at 44 yards with a board at 10 yards that blocked my view when shooting prone so I used my Sheridan 20 caliber pump air gun and aimed over the board and managed to hit them using one or 2 pumps. It was sorta like artillery. 😁
 
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