Oklahoma Hunting Forum banner
21 - 31 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Long story short, born and raised in Oregon. Had some good hunting almost exclusively n the Southern Oregon Foothills. (called mountains in OK.).

First deer 1964-Oregon Blacktail, Jackson County.

View attachment 6894

Last Oregon Blacktail-1986, Josephine County.

View attachment 6895

Left Oregon for my career, ended up in Oklahoma in 2014-widower chasing a Okie Widow. She caught me. Lately age and infirmity dictated a change in hunting style for me. All my life I worked hard, played hard and accumulated back, shoulder, knee and heart injuries. For me getting down and up from the ground is difficult. I have adapted my hunting style here in Oklahoma to paying outfitters.

I Don't particularly care for sitting in a deer stand. But having a younger than me guide doing all the work, taking care of my deer sure is nice. I do miss the walking around and the exercise. They say you are only as old as you feel. If I were 63 I would be looking for a lease and all the work that is involved in that. But I am 73 and some days I even feel older. I do not think I could do it now. But I am still hunting

Good luck with your quest to hunt OK deer.
We lived in the Rogue Valley for 19 years. Applegate and Eagle Point so JoCo and Jackson county are very familiar to me. I appreciate your comments and approach. I was fortunate enough to hang around a couple of mature gentlemen that were still getting out there well into their 80s. Vern Struble up in Corvallis and Don Pritchett (DewClaw Archery) who is STILL archery elk hunting in his 80s. I admire them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
To add to Dennis' suggestions, you can get permethrin at Tractor Supply and dilute it down to save a few bucks. I have snake gaiters that I'll wear some until it gets cooler. I have came across a couple of pygmy rattlers so being cautious. The plastic sled is a great idea. I have also found a padded ski rope handle with about 10' of nylon rope to work well.

Don't forget chiggers in your list! Luckily permethrin works on them as well. Be sure to let sprayed clothes dry.
Do you spray everything with it. Hat, jackets, shirts, pants, boots, etc?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
14,234 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,542 Posts
Long story short, born and raised in Oregon. Had some good hunting almost exclusively n the Southern Oregon Foothills. (called mountains in OK.).

First deer 1964-Oregon Blacktail, Jackson County.

View attachment 6894

Last Oregon Blacktail-1986, Josephine County.

View attachment 6895

Left Oregon for my career, ended up in Oklahoma in 2014-widower chasing a Okie Widow. She caught me. Lately age and infirmity dictated a change in hunting style for me. All my life I worked hard, played hard and accumulated back, shoulder, knee and heart injuries. For me getting down and up from the ground is difficult. I have adapted my hunting style here in Oklahoma to paying outfitters.

I Don't particularly care for sitting in a deer stand. But having a younger than me guide doing all the work, taking care of my deer sure is nice. I do miss the walking around and the exercise. They say you are only as old as you feel. If I were 63 I would be looking for a lease and all the work that is involved in that. But I am 73 and some days I even feel older. I do not think I could do it now. But I am still hunting

Good luck with your quest to hunt OK deer.
As long as you get out!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
171 Posts
Applegate has some big Deer. Had an Aunt in law who had a small farm up Thompson Creek and we hunted it a lot. When I took that that buck in 86 I took it on property out of Murphy owned by a professor at the college I attended. A couple of days later my son killed one about the same size on the Aunts place. Loved the Applegate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,102 Posts
You may have already figured this one out, but one thing worth mentioning is hunting tactics. I'm not sure how you hunt blacktails, but I'd recon it would be similar to elk or mulleys, probably spot and stalk. I'm not saying you can't do that in certain Okla terrain or in certain scenarios, but it is far more common to ambush hunt whitetails. Tree stands are the most common approach, sitting along travel corridors. You may gain weight hunting whitetails as opposed to stalking the game you're accustomed to in OR or AK. The terrain isn't nearly as challenging here either, which is fairly obvious. I just got back from a week of mulley hunting in CO and came back 5# lighter, and I ate good the entire trip too. Whitetail hunting seems almost lazy compared to what I just endured.

Anyhow, welcome aboard
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
14,234 Posts
You may have already figured this one out, but one thing worth mentioning is hunting tactics. I'm not sure how you hunt blacktails, but I'd recon it would be similar to elk or mulleys, probably spot and stalk. I'm not saying you can't do that in certain Okla terrain or in certain scenarios, but it is far more common to ambush hunt whitetails. Tree stands are the most common approach, sitting along travel corridors. You may gain weight hunting whitetails as opposed to stalking the game you're accustomed to in OR or AK. The terrain isn't nearly as challenging here either, which is fairly obvious. I just got back from a week of mulley hunting in CO and came back 5# lighter, and I ate good the entire trip too. Whitetail hunting seems almost lazy compared to what I just endured.

Anyhow, welcome aboard
Elk hunting is like that. Eat like kings in camp and lose weight moving around the mountains.
 
  • Like
Reactions: retrieverman

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
171 Posts
When I hunted whitetails in Montana I would walk the stubble fields looking at the brushy weedy draws and weedy fence lines with my binoculars. Once spotted, then I would use rolling terrain to stalk closer. It was not uncommon for the whitetail to just lay down flat in the places and let a hunter walk by real close. They would hold hard. Once spooked however they would explode and run until they got to the next county. My favorite place to hunt them was CRP land.

The blacktail weren't a spooky deer. The thick tight brush I hunted them in made them hard to spot. In the brush they we would just move away and not be seen. In the open they would run like a mule deer to the nearest cover. You could spot them around clear cuts and openings and some times have longer shots, but I never took many because it was always easier to stay in the brush and get closer. My first archery doe was killed from about 5 yards, yes 15 feet. As I stalked into the wind towards them they were feeding with the wind towards me.

The whitetail I have seen here in OK seem to be real spooky. They see a person and they take off. I think they could be stalked, but not easily. The brush here is more open, the deer can see you further away so they spook sooner. We were hunting turkey a few years ago out of Wapanucka and were in a thick brush area. Deer were every where and as long we were careful they did not spook. They were jittery, and got jumpy when I change back and forth from the slate call to the diaphragm call.

It's all about learning the critters in your area and hunting that way. No feeders or bait in Oregon or Montana. I have wonder how conditioned the animals get to being fed.
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top