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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Acquired a Browning Sweet 16 at a farm auction in Osage County about 20 years ago when someone let go of their dads Browning collection.
It was a 1946 vintage that had never been shot.
Long story about why I won't bore you with about why it hadn't been shot, but that shotgun and I have had a love affair ever since. When something fly's it dies.
Ammo has always been expensive and hard to find but available at a premium price until an internet friend that got interested in 16 ga found a shooter in Dallas Tx that was liquidating his inventory. Not sure of the history, but he ended up with 30 cases of Eley 16 ga shotshells which would be three lifetimes of ammo for him, so he offered some to me at a price I couldn't pass up.
I ended up with 8 cases of #8"s and one case of #5's along with a case of Remmington #4's and some assorted other brands for another case.
They are European shells that are 2.5" vs American 2 3/4" with one ounce shot. They also don't have plastic wad cups as the Europeans consider plastic as pollution. Felt spacers is what they use that are biodegradable.
1 oz loads that take dove out of the sky just as well as any other round but the issue is that the velocity is a tad slower than the US cousins. I've got the spacers in the Browning set at the lowest setting possible and they just don't eject as well as I like, sometimes not even ejecting from the cylinder. I don't think the recoil spring has the oomph after short cycling to put the ejector over the case rim.
I have 100% success from American built rounds fired through the same gun so not going to change anything.
So, a couple years ago, FIL passed away and left me some guns. Into the safe they went, and we left town on one of our tours.
I was remembering some of our conversations and he told me he was a big fan of the 16 ga so I went to the safe and started digging until finding one he gave me that was a Remington Sportsman 48 that appeared to have never been fired in 16 ga.
Took it to my shooting berm in the back yard and fired 5 rounds through it as fast as I could pull the trigger and it never failed. AWESOME!
That is the shotgun used last night to take the 10 dove and it ran without any issues. (well lubed before going to the field)
So with that long story, I have the shotgun to finish the rest of those Eley's. There are no choke markings on the barrel, but some reading tonight said most were issued with modified chokes. I have enough ammo that it might justify getting some remchokes installed.
 

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I don’t know why. But I’ve never been able to hit anything with one of those humpbacks. Don’t know if it’s the hump messing my aim up or what. But I can put one down and pick up any other shotgun and never miss.


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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don’t know why. But I’ve never been able to hit anything with one of those humpbacks. Don’t know if it’s the hump messing my aim up or what. But I can put one down and pick up any other shotgun and never miss.


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That sweet 16 and I have a love affair.
When I shoot, something typically dies.
I think it’s because of my tendency to not keep a correct cheek weld following through the shot so the hump compensates somewhat? Dunno.
The Rem Sportsman is going to require more shooting discipline than I’m currently using to get better with.
Then I move to my double shotguns during quail and pheasant seasons which is another learning curve to get adjusted
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
When can I meet you to take that A-5 off your hands?


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I got it at a farm auction on Doga creek road about15 or so years ago. You may have been there?
A neighbor wanted to liquidate his dads shotgun collection that included about 20 or so Auto 5’s.
The stupid Fawk auctioneer told the ring hands to mark bidders numbers with grease pencils on the walnut stocks which caused quite the uproar among bidders.
That move cost the gun values to go down a couple hundred bucks each.
Took me a long time to get that grease pencil crap off the stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I have one model 12 built in 1928, the year of my dads birth.
It was given to me by a coworker that was scared of it because the action wouldn’t lock up when in battery.
Found a small flat spring in the receiver that was broken, so Numerich fixed that issue.
It had a piece of asbestos brake lining for a buttstock pad with the stock also busted from using too thick of a socket to put the tang bolt back on.
Bought a new stock that was unfinished from Missouri and refinished it. 28 layers of birch wood Casey gun stock finish so it looks really deep.
Had a friend that has since passed away in Tulsa do a period correct rust blue job on it that’s beautiful.
Be a day or two to post pics as I have to be gone to MIL Bday.
 

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The one on the top in my photo is a 1931 vintage, that dad had the vent rib, buttstock, and rebluing done on. It was his trap gun.

The 42 is a 1940s vintage, and is all original. The other three were all made in the 1950s. Unfortunately most if them have recoil pads added (except for the 16ga), so that cuts value down.

I have their years of manufacture written down in my log book, but the exact years escape my memory.
 
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