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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife's first cousin, was the one that actually discovered the sticking throttle problem.
I farm part of their family land. Called him tonight, and told him to take cover as I'd heard a squad of Japenese Ninja's were coming for him
Here is the news story:

http://www.poncacitynews.com/templat...9422024575.bsp

Tonkawa Native Finds Defect In Toyota Vehicles




By LOUISE ABERCROMBIE



News Business Editor



A former Tonkawa farm boy deduced what Toyota couldn't or wouldn't on the problem with its vehicle throttle electronic control system.



Dr. David W. Gilbert, son of Keith and Iva Gilbert of Tonkawa, is credited with finding the glitch in the vehicle throttle control system that allows sudden unintended acceleration. This Toyota defect has caused numerous accidents and deaths.



The answer, according to Gilbert, is there was no proper trouble code set for the auto's computer to detect the acceleration problem.



Keith Gilbert said, "When he starts something he gets to the bottom of it. He is a farm boy and when you live on the farm you have to fix things."



Dr. Gilbert, a professor of automotive technology at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, has been testifying before the sub-committee of the Committee on Energy and Commerce about the cause of the default in the Toyota throttle control system. As a result he has appeared on CNN, Good Morning America and other national networks.



Gilbert graduated from Tonkawa High School, Northern Oklahoma College, and Oklahoma State University where he earned his master's degree. He received his doctorate in Illinois, where he invented a testing system that could vary automotive problems for his students to solve. Gilbert began teaching in 1981 at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College, Miami, when electronic fuel-injected vehicles were relatively a new technology.



When Gilbert first solved the Toyota problem, in about three hours, according to his father, he tried telephoning the Toyota divisions on both the east and the west coasts. Gilbert said they hung up on him so he called the safety auto group in Chicago, an independent group, which furnishes cars for his students to work on at the Southern Illinois University Carbondale.



The Safety Auto Dealers of Chicago took it from there, according to his father.



Gilbert was asked to write a report to give to the sub-committee, which he did. Next he testified before the Energy and Commerce sub-committee on Tuesday.



In his testimony Gilbert said in part, "I have found electrical diagnostic skills to be supremely important diagnosing and repairing modern vehicles. And, I have spent many hours studying and analyzing new electrical circuits and components."



Part of Gilbert's exercise for his classes is to purposely duplicate multiple types of electrical problems in donated vehicles for his students to study and diagnose. In his testimony, Gilbert said, "It stands to reason, that my daily teaching responsibilities would include the application and understanding of electronic throttle control diagnostics. I have the unique perspective in my employment, to research and study multiple vehicles and electronic throttle control system designs.



"In this preliminary report, my initial findings question the integrity and consistency of Toyota Electric Control Modules to detect potential electronic throttle control system circuit malfunctions. The absence of a stored diagnostic trouble code in the vehicle's computer is no guarantee that a problem does not exist," he said.



"I instruct all my automotive students with this fundamental statement: You can have a code with no problem — and a problem with no code."



Gilbert's curiosity in the Toyota throttle control system led him to buy a 2010 Toyota Tundra and do his own investigation.



In the report to the sub-committee, Gilbert says, "Knowing that properly operating electronic throttle control system circuits and components are vital to safe vehicle operation, I proceeded to investigate the problem with more urgency."



With his experience working on electronic throttle controls he realized that the system could be easily fooled without detecting a circuit fault and setting a diagnostic trouble code.



He made the discovery late one evening, and found that the electrical circuit faults could be introduced into the throttle control system without setting a diagnostic trouble code. Without a diagnostic trouble code set, the vehicle computer will not logically enter into a fail-safe mode of operation.



A life-long automobile "tinker," David, as a high school sophomore, had three trailers loads of automobile parts and completely rebuilt a 1930 Model A. He continued to tinker and improve the car until he graduated from OSU. He was married to Deanna Sue Eddlemond in 1983 and they have a daughter Kara, a college student, and a son Keith Jr., a high school student.



David's father, a retired industrial arts teacher, taught in Kansas, and worked at a number of industries with mechanical experience, while farming and teaching. He has some safety advise for drivers who might have throttle control trouble in the future. He said, "practice shifting into neutral, step on the brakes hard, notice the surroundings and shut off the ignition." When the ignition is shut off the vehicle loses power steering control. So it is important to be aware of the surroundings to avoid other hazards."



Dr. Gilbert's full testimony can be viewed at www.poncacity.com/documents or viewed on C-Span 3.
 

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I would say good ole ******* engineering wins again, but he sounds like he's waaay better than that. Funny how the corperate bigwigs wouldn't listen to him. He deserves a big Atta Boy for finding the problem and getting it pushed thru all the corperate red tape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Update: Stamford University in Commiefornia validated his findings.
After his testimony before Congress on CSPAN, he and his family have had to move to an undisclosed location due to threatening phone calls and phone calls that were totally in Japenese. They recorded them, and a translater confirmed they were threatening.
The college he teaches at, trains future automotive engineers. Toyota has been a sponsor of the college, supplying vehicles for them to work on. On his return from testifying before congress, he found out Toyota had came and took all the cars away, and took back their sponsorship of the school.
Maybe my joke about the squad of Ninja's coming for him is not too far from the truth? :eek:
 

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That's just scary. I can tell you that NHTSA is one of the main agencies in the DOT that investigate safety issues with cars and Toyota is far from out of the woods over all of this. I would be willing to bet more cover ups will come to light before it's over and folks wanna dis on American car manufactures..I have always liked my Toyota cars but no manufacturer is immune to oversight and safety issues nor will they ever be able to make the perfect vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It seems that manufacturers rush products into the market without really testing them in the real world.
Its not just cars, but guns are the same way. Most of the new sub compact .380's that are flooding the market are in the second and third generation after recalls. Most of which could have surfaced if proper testing had been performed before hand.
 

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I think it all boils down to cost. It costs money to thoroughly test a product and I think many feel it's cheaper to deal with a few recalls then to go through that sort of testing.
 

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I think it all boils down to cost. It costs money to thoroughly test a product and I think many feel it's cheaper to deal with a few recalls then to go through that sort of testing.
Kind of like Micro Soft and the newest operating systems.

You'd think with all the bad press Toyota is getting they'd of been really suckin up to the schools and such. They need any and all good words that they can muster.
 
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