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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand it is wise to get some horseback or mule riding experience under one's belt before taking to the saddle for the very first time right in the field. Greenhorns who book hunts often get miserably saddle sore if their bodies aren't already broken into this sort of 4-leg-drive vehicle. The western saddle is not comfy like the driver seat of a Lincoln automobile, I gather from reading and videos.
 

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My experience as way back in 1985. I had never rode a horse. I did not have any problems going from 8,000 feet to 11,000 and having a horse jump over a log. In 1986 we went again and on the 4 mile trail ride back to the cabin I hurt. I had them gve me a wider saddle and never had another problem. I rode that horse down hills I would not have walked. That steep.
 

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Curious how then all of the guides in the Grand Canyon stay in business. Guess everyone's an experienced horse/mule rider before signing up? Pretty broad brush you're painting with there ACJ and not sure how you make your assumptions. I'll leave you with some Joni Mitchell lyrics. Read into it what you will.

And the seasons, they go round and round
And the painted ponies go up and down
We're captive on the carousel of time
We can't return, we can only look
Behind, from where we came
And go round and round and round, in the circle game
 

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I spend a helluva lot time in a saddle and have rode countless different saddles. The saddles I use now we’re hand made and I’d just as soon set in one of them than my truck or recliner at home but just because they are handmade doesn’t make them comfortable. I’ve rode some cheap trail and ranch saddles as well and got along just fine. The one key thing to comfort is stirrup length and your body posture. Ideal stirrup length is when you can stand straight up in your stirrups and place a closed fist between your taint and the front part of the seat. That’s the area that taint your butthole and taint your scrotum. It’s the little spot that has the seam in it where God sowed you up. If you can put a closed fist there it will make your ride more enjoyable. I’m not saying this will automatically make you ride like Ben Cartwright or John Wayne. You still have to have some coordination and be able to get in time with the horse. Ideally when the horses front feet hit the ground in any of the horses gaits you should relax your legs enough to just feel the saddle on your taint. As the horse front feet come up you should flex your legs to were you almost stand up in your stirrups but not completely. Doing this also helps your horse because your entire body weight isn’t just setting there on his back like dead weight. Otherwise the horses upward motion will be hitting your downward motion leaving you and the “Boys” pretty sore. You want your head and shoulders square and straight above it’s withers. Once you get the hang of it you can totally relax your body and just flex your legs to get in time with the horse.
Lots of people’s first horse riding experiences have been ruined because of the stirrups not being the correct length. Too long and you will have no control and get the crap beat out of you. Too short and you will gaul and blister the inside of your legs and you won’t want to wipe your bunger for weeks cause it’s sore.
Good luck and make sure to get your stirrups the right length.


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The only way to get saddle experience is to just get in the saddle. I know of no place, even here in Wyoming, that does horseback rides into the mountains for the sake of conditioning one for a mountain hunting trip. There are lots and lots of horseback rides in the mountains for sightseeing and fishing trips for tourists nun of which require experience in the saddle first. That’s why the guides and outfitters match horses and mules to riders based off of experience established in Q&A forms prior to signing up for such excursions.
I been and many many guided trail rides in all sorts of country and terrains, here in the US and overseas.
Find a place that offers horse riding lessons or 1-3 hour trail rides and go do that. It’s up to you to learn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I found this Wyoming guide video about horseback hunting. The scabbard setup looks stupid mounted horizontally under the rider's right leg as shown. I've seen enough cowboy pictures to know that a rifle is in a vertical scabbard is not ever in the way of the rider's leg. I believe the cowboy scabbards are mounted at the wither's of the animal in easy reach of the mounted rider. The gun should be carried on the strong side (right side) of the horse unless one is a southpaw shooter??



Also the video shows a saddle horn on the horse. Is the western (not English) ridng discipline the way to go for all North American big-game hunting on horseback?
 

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Well don’t believe what you see in Hollywood movies. It’s fiction for a reason. Most everyone I see and know around here who hunts from /with horses and mules has the scabbard under the leg. It may look stupid to you but it’s very practical and the leg also keeps it close and secure.
SNS outfitters is one of the largest back country outfitters that uses horses and pack teams in WY. I’m familiar with them and areas they hunt. I’ve seen this video several times before. It’s even explained in it why the scabbards under the leg.
Saddle horns help the rider grip and stay steady on inclines and when crossing rough terrain such as logs and creeks.

You seem to wanna debate an activity and how such an activity is conducted yet you have stated you have zero experience and knowledge of it. They old saying goes “Don’t knock it until you try it”.
 

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I prefer riding with the rifle vertical so I can access it when the posse catches up and jams me in a canyon, under the leg costs me time and time is a luxury my line of work does not afford me. I also learned to ride from the lords of the plains and am just as fast if not faster with my bow ridding with several arrows in one hand no saddle and on the side of the horse shielding myself this is until they run me out of the grocery store and it’s just me the huffy and some old Louis l’amour paper back. Another glass of this Makers Mark and I’ll take this ride with you.
 

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I prefer riding with the rifle vertical so I can access it when the posse catches up and jams me in a canyon, under the leg costs me time and time is a luxury my line of work does not afford me. I also learned to ride from the lords of the plains and am just as fast if not faster with my bow ridding with several arrows in one hand no saddle and on the side of the horse shielding myself this is until they run me out of the grocery store and it’s just me the huffy and some old Louis l’amour paper back. Another glass of this Makers Mark and I’ll take this ride with you.
Fill your hands you sons of [email protected]#$hes!


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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Here is a smart-looking scabbard. I can just see myself with a Savage Model 99 in that setup after moose, elk or deer. Skinner rear peep sight. No scope. Lever action. Like an old-fashioned cowboy. I think modern scoped bolt-action rifles need that under the leg horizontal job. I like the notion I can just grab my gun on the back of the horse in case of Indians, cougar, wolf or bear. Out of the way of the leg or knee. The Winchester Saddle Ring Carbine was just made for American horsemen.
Horse Working animal Saddle Halter Horse tack


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Horse Working animal Halter Horse tack Mammal


1900 Long Gun Scabbard


The Model 1900 Long Gun Scabbard is part of the Kenda Lenseigne Signature Series specifically developed by Kenda Lenseigne for mounted shooting. Designed to fit shotguns, rifles and carbines, to be mounted on the front of the saddle. Closed muzzle with drain hole. Includes 3 tie-downs to secure scabbard, 2 horizontal, and 1 vertical. Adjustable ride height strap for snug carry on saddle horn. Solid Brass buckles on tan models, chrome covered brass buckles on black. Available in premium full grain leather. Chestnut Tan.

Fits lever action rifles and carbines
Closed muzzle with drain hole
Includes 3 tie downs to secure scabbard, 2 horizontal and 1 vertical
Adjustable ride height strap for snug carry on saddle horn
Premium grade full grain, vegetable tanned leather
Available in Chestnut Tan; solid brass buckles on tan
 

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We have real horseman cowboys on here that ride day in and day out after cattle and such. Let’s see what they prefer?
I say again to lay off the Hollywood theatrics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Here is a video on scabbards for hunting:


 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
A lever-action is much more practical for horseback. No bolt handle to catch on anything. Easier to cycle holding the reins. Look at how low the butt of the rifle is in this photo, no reining interference here:
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AR is a far superior saddle gun.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
It's true Chuck Connors had his rifle barrel under his right leg, but the butt is forward and the gun is easy to draw in a hurry..........and what a very nice horse, very noble face, Razor was a beautiful black thoroughbred from the race track:

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
AR is a far superior saddle gun.
yes, if your quarry is armed enemy H0mo sapiens, M4 Carbine: The Weapon for The New Cavalry, but this thread is about big game

Can your AR double tap beat Chuck on his 1892 Winchester caliber . 44-40 carbine?

 
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