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Well seeing as in how I’m getting into the center fire projectile building game I thought I’d see who all on her tinkers with reloading? I know several of you do and do so heavily but curious who else does.

I’m taking a break from sorting and cleaning over 2k rounds of rifle, pistol and 12g that we’ve been shooting and keeping the last 2 years since living here.

In all it’s 7 rifle, 5 pistol and 1 scattergun calibers to inspect, organize and clean.
 

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Reloaded my first center fire in 1980, and first shotshell in 81.
It’s pretty much cheaper to buy dove loads vs reloading them prior to this ammo shortage. Premium loads have always been cheaper to reload. Lead shot prices are through the roof now but I have several hundred pounds of shot rat holed if SHTF and I run out of shotgun shells which won’t be likely.
 

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I would like to get into it but really don’t know where to start there are so many different powders and such for particular calibers and people I know that do reload have stacks of books and journals coming out their ears it seems like. I wouldn’t mind getting into it but it sure seems like a lot goes into a bullet.
 

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I would like to get into it but really don’t know where to start there are so many different powders and such for particular calibers and people I know that do reload have stacks of books and journals coming out their ears it seems like. I wouldn’t mind getting into it but it sure seems like a lot goes into a bullet.
Loading for a rifle can be as complicated as you make it, and with the up to date resources of the internet, reloading manual are really not needed anymore (in my opinion). I load for or have loaded for probably 15 different cartridges.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would like to get into it but really don’t know where to start there are so many different powders and such for particular calibers and people I know that do reload have stacks of books and journals coming out their ears it seems like. I wouldn’t mind getting into it but it sure seems like a lot goes into a bullet.
I was the same. This particular “Speer” book that came with my setup breaks all that down.Breaks every step of the process down and talks about why that step is important. Shows photos of the different powders and breaks down the burn rates. It’s quite facinsting really. I used to reload 12g for skeet shoot some 20 years ago. This center fire stuff had me worried I’d blow myself up with a bad load. I have no fears now other than lack of supplies.
I’ve also watched a bunch of YouTube videos on reloading.
 

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Started reloading in 1972-38 SPL and 357 Mag in 1972. I I now focus on .577/450 Martini, 450 Musket No.2. Working on loading .303 ammunition right now. No, not .303 British that uses a .311 or larger bullet, but the predecessor that uses a .303 bullet. I can use standard .303 British brass, but I use a bushing die to neck the brass down to hold the .303 diameter bullet. A bit advance it sounds, but really just the basics with special tooling.

I am going contradict slightly some thing retrieverman has said. Be very careful of what you find on the internet. Before using anything on the internet research the source. Are they creditable. Even then be sure you start low. Never start with a Maximum load. For some one starting out new, get the loading manual for the bullets you intend use. Bullets of the same weight from two different manufacturers may not be the same shape and can give you two different results. Powders are critical. Some powders have specific safe operating range. Excessive pressure can develop from to light a charge as well as to large.

Don't get me wrong there is some very good and useful stuff on the internet, just check the credentials

Another one to be aware is the loading programs. Load from a disc for example.. Some of the loads generated from this program exceed published loads and with powders not recommended for the particular cartridge.

After reloading for 50 years, I still enjoy it.
 

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Have been reloading since '85, started loading .270 Win then 30-30 Win. Now, I've have those two and I have a box or two of .223/556, 6.8SPC, 45ACP, 9mm laying around here somewhere. Consistency is the key to accuracy. I like to load 3 rounds of ammo starting with the lightest load and 3 with the next heaviest load so on and so on, up to the max recommended load for that powder. Then, I'll shoot the three rounds at a blank paper, 3 on another so on and so on. What I'm looking for is the best 3 round group and signs of overpressure. I don't care where they hit on the paper (scopes can adjust for that) but the tightest group is what your gun likes the best. And keep good records of your reloading, what kind & how much powder, COL/OAL and that's about it. Like The Double D said, if you change bullets, you'll need to work up a load for that specific bullet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Good words of safety and window y’all.
 

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Started reloading in 1972-38 SPL and 357 Mag in 1972. I I now focus on .577/450 Martini, 450 Musket No.2. Working on loading .303 ammunition right now. No, not .303 British that uses a .311 or larger bullet, but the predecessor that uses a .303 bullet. I can use standard .303 British brass, but I use a bushing die to neck the brass down to hold the .303 diameter bullet. A bit advance it sounds, but really just the basics with special tooling.

I am going contradict slightly some thing retrieverman has said. Be very careful of what you find on the internet. Before using anything on the internet research the source. Are they creditable. Even then be sure you start low. Never start with a Maximum load. For some one starting out new, get the loading manual for the bullets you intend use. Bullets of the same weight from two different manufacturers may not be the same shape and can give you two different results. Powders are critical. Some powders have specific safe operating range. Excessive pressure can develop from to light a charge as well as to large.

Don't get me wrong there is some very good and useful stuff on the internet, just check the credentials

Another one to be aware is the loading programs. Load from a disc for example.. Some of the loads generated from this program exceed published loads and with powders not recommended for the particular cartridge.

After reloading for 50 years, I still enjoy it.
I was referring to Hodgdon, Alliant, and the like as resources, and if you can’t trust the powder manufacturers, we might as well start chunking rocks.:rolleyes:
 

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If one has questions about a particular powder/primer/ bullet combo, both the bullet or the powder manufacturer will take phone calls. They have a vested interest in creating safe loads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If one has questions about a particular powder/primer/ bullet combo, both the bullet or the powder manufacturer will take phone calls. They have a vested interest in creating safe loads.
The Speer book said the very same thing.
 
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The Speer book said the very same thing.
The problem I see with books is they’re more than likely “outdated” by the time you get them. They’re still applicable but just not as “current” as what‘s online. I‘ve got a Barnes manual, and it’s a 2008 copy. There’ve been a lot of new powder development since then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The Speer and Lymans books I’ve got are both the latest additions.
 
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I used an old Speer manual to get myself started. It has most everything the beginner needs to know.

As far as current bullet/powder combos, I just look at several websites/downloads and kind of average out where ill start and stop at.

It never hurts to start at the bottom and work up if you aren't sure. I did that just a few months ago with a buddy's load and was really glad I did. We were using military brass in his .308, and I popped a primer at just 1.2 gr up from the recommended starting point.
 

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The problem I see with books is they’re more than likely “outdated” by the time you get them. They’re still applicable but just not as “current” as what‘s online. I‘ve got a Barnes manual, and it’s a 2008 copy. There’ve been a lot of new powder development since then.
My Sierra book is from the 80’s before lawyers took over reloading.
It’s amazing to compare loads from then to now at the top of the scale.
 

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My Sierra book is from the 80’s before lawyers took over reloading.
It’s amazing to compare loads from then to now at the top of the scale.
I've noticed that in some of my books. I just thought the powder got hotter!!! LOL
 
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